10 Books I’m Reading in 2020

by Brad Merchant | Mar 12, 2020 | Articles

Charles Spurgeon once said, “Give yourself unto reading. The man who never reads will never be read; he who never quotes will never be quoted. He who will not use the thoughts of other men’s brains proves that he has no brains of his own. You need to read.”

In light of that wisdom, I put together a list of books I want to read each year. Here are the ten books I’m most excited about reading in 2020:

 

1. Gentle and Lowly: The Heart of Christ for Sinners and Sufferers by Dane Ortlund

Synopsis: Christians know that God loves them, but can easily feel that he is perpetually disappointed and frustrated, maybe even close to giving up on them. As a result, they focus a lot—and rightly so—on what Jesus has done to appease God’s wrath for sin. But how does Jesus Christ actually feel about his people amid all their sins and failures?

 

2. Exploring the Bible Together: A 52-Week Family Worship Plan by David Murray

Synopsis: This new resource by counselor and professor David Murray will help families establish regular family devotions through realistic aims, a clear plan and direction, and stimulating interaction with Scripture and prayer.

 

3. Stott on the Christian Life by Tim Chester

Synopsis: This book explores themes he emphasized, such as the development of the mind, expository preaching, balance in the Christian life, and “double listening,” illuminating his enduring influence on the church, evangelism, and missions today.

 

4. Finding the Right Hills to Die On by Gavin Ortlund

Synopsis: In theology, just as in battle, some hills are worth dying on. But how do we know which ones? When should doctrine divide, and when should unity prevail? Pastor Gavin Ortlund makes the case that while all doctrines matter, some are more essential than others. He considers how and what to prioritize in doctrine and ministry, encouraging humility and grace along the way.

 

5. Dynamics of Spiritual Life by Richard Lovelace

Synopsis: In this classic work of spiritual theology, historian Richard Lovelace presents a history of spiritual renewals in light of biblical models. Drawing from the best of different Protestant traditions, Dynamics of Spiritual Life lays out a comprehensive approach to the renewal of the church.

 

6. The Possibility of Prayer by John Starke

SynopsisThe world clamors for efficiency and productivity. But the life of prayer is neither efficient nor productive. Instead, as we learn in the psalms, prayer calls us to wait, to watch, to listen, to taste, and to see. These things are not productive by any modern measure—but they are transformative.

 

7. The Basics of Christian Belief: Bible, Theology, and Life’s Big Questions by Joshua Strahan

Synopsis: This reader-friendly yet robust introduction to the Christian faith explores the essentials of Christianity and the impact they have on life, worldview, and witness. Written in an accessible and engaging voice for college-age readers, the book connects the biblical plotline, the Apostles’ Creed, the comparative distinctiveness of Christianity, and life’s big questions.

 

8. God’s Relational Presence: The Cohesive Center of Biblical Theology by Scott Duvall

Synopsis: Two leading biblical scholars and bestselling authors offer a fresh approach to the question of the unity of the whole Bible. This book shows that God’s desire to be with his people is a thread running from Genesis through Revelation.

 

9. Idols of a Mother’s Heart by Christina Fox

Synopsis: Even good things can become idols if we give them central importance in our lives. Having children changes everything, and as mothers, we risk looking for life, purpose and meaning in motherhood. While being a mother brings its unique set of challenges, these years of raising children and helping them grow in the nurture and admonition of the Lord provide an opportunity to grow in our own Christlikeness as well.

 

10. Redeeming How We Talk by A.J. Swoboda

Synopsis: Technology has made it easier than ever before to share just about everything: pictures, ideas, even the ups and downs of your morning errand run. Yet all our talking doesn’t seem to be connecting us the way it promised to. That’s because we don’t need to talk more, we need to talk better. Redeeming How We Talk explores what the Bible has to say about that central aspect of life and relationships–conversation.